Open Access
Issue
SHS Web Conf.
Volume 119, 2021
3rd International Conference on Quantitative and Qualitative Methods for Social Sciences (QQR’21)
Article Number 01003
Number of page(s) 11
Section Empirical Studies: Quantitative and Qualitative
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/shsconf/202111901003
Published online 24 August 2021
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